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Agriculture 1700-1900

Subjects / History / Agriculture, Industry and Transport 1700-1900

Price: £1.95 Duration: 18mins Full topic price: £10.95

As Great Britain's population increased during the 18th and 19th centuries so did the need to feed this growing population. British landowners realised that huge profits could be made if they could increase the amount of food they could grow on their farms. The main problem was that farming techniques and ideas had not changed much in Great Britain since the Middle Ages. This situation had to change if more food was to be grown. Fortunately for British farmers and landowners, new ideas from abroad, improved scientific techniques and an increased enthusiasm completely rejuvenated British farming. This led to a number of dramatic changes taking place in British agriculture during the 18th and 19th centuries, which resulted in this period of time being called the Agricultural Revolution.

Author: Nicky Boughey Publisher: GCSEPod®
Narrator: Peter McGowan ISBN: 978-1-84906-226-8
Video ISBN: 978-1-84906-726-3

Chapters

  1. Agricultural Revolution, 1700 to 1815
  2. The Corn Laws and their Repeal, 1815 to 1846
  3. The Golden Age, 1840 to 1870
  4. The Depression, 1870 to 1900

Exam Board Relevance

  • Edxcel
  • AQA
  • CEA
  • IGCSE (EdExcel)
  • OCR
  • SQA
  • WJEC
  • IGCSE (CiE)

Includes original GCSEPod image art

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Curriculum and Exam Board Information

Key Issues

Titles

Chapters

  • Agriculture and rural society in the middle of the eighteenth century
  • Anti-Corn Law League
  • Canal mania
  • changes in farming practice
  • Changes in farming practices
  • Changes in village life and work in different parts of Britain
  • Coastal transport
  • Competition
  • Corn Laws, 1815-1846
  • Defects of Open Field System
  • Demand for improved transport
  • Disadvantages of road transport
  • Economic effects of water transport
  • Economic factors, including machinery
  • Economic factors, including technical developments
  • Economic factors, including the weather
  • Economic factors, including transport
  • Effects of the French Wars
  • Effects of transport improvements
  • Enclosure
  • Farm labourers
  • French Wars
  • Increase in demand for food from growth of population and towns
  • Irish Potato Famine
  • Lack of overseas competition
  • Landowners and Parliament
  • Large farms
  • Market gardening
  • moves towards commercialised agriculture and the effects of new technology and foreign competition
  • Navigable and unnavigable rivers across Britain
  • New crops and machinery
  • New tools, crops, breeds, crop rotation, including the work of Bakewell
  • New tools, crops, breeds, crop rotation, including the work of Coke
  • New tools, crops, breeds, crop rotation, including the work of Townsend
  • New tools, crops, breeds, crop rotation, including the work of Tull
  • Opposition to early railways
  • Ownership of land
  • Peel
  • Peel and Huskisson
  • Poor harvest
  • Problems and solutions involved in railway construction
  • Profit motive
  • Propagandists, including Arthur Young
  • Railway development
  • Railway mania
  • Railways
  • regional differences
  • Regional variations
  • Riots
  • Road engineers, including the work of Macadam in Wales, central and southern England
  • Road engineers, including the work of Metcalfe in the north of England
  • Road engineers, including the work of Telford in Wales, central and southern England
  • Road engineers, including the work of Wade in Scotland
  • Science
  • Sliding Scales
  • Social and economic effects
  • Social and economic effects of railways
  • Steam
  • The anti-Corn Law campaign
  • The coaching age
  • The contribution of early engineers
  • the Corn Laws
  • The development of a canal network
  • The effect of agricultural improvers and inventions: the role of Bakewell
  • The effect of agricultural improvers and inventions: the role of Coke
  • The effect of agricultural improvers and inventions: the role of Townshend
  • The effect of agricultural improvers and inventions: the roles of Young
  • The effect of the Great Depression and foreign competition on agriculture in different parts of Britain
  • The growth of a national railway network, including the work of Brunel
  • The growth of a national railway network, including the work of Stephenson
  • The impact of agricultural improvers including Bakewell
  • The impact of agricultural improvers including the Colling brothers
  • The impact of agricultural improvers including Townshend
  • The impact of agricultural improvers including Tull
  • The impact of the French wars and the Corn Laws
  • the impact of these changes on rural employment.
  • The Open Field System
  • The open-field system, its regional location advantages and disadvantages
  • The problems of constructing canals and the work of the canal engineers
  • The repeal of the Corn Laws: the development and importance of 'high farming'
  • The role of the agricultural propagandists including Coke in spreading the new ideas
  • The role of the agricultural propagandists including George III in spreading the new ideas
  • The role of the agricultural propagandists including Young in spreading the new ideas
  • The speed of change from subsistence farming to farming for the open market
  • The state of roads across Britain in 1700
  • Transport improvements
  • Turnpike trusts

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