Email this page to a friend
Sign up for a GCSEPod RSS News Feed

Don't want to miss any of the latest GCSEPod news, upgrade and title information? Sign up for a GCSEPod RSS news feed. It's simple. Here's how.

Forgotten password? New to GCSEPod?   Register
Log in:

Christian Attitudes Towards Life, Suffering and Death

Subjects / Religious Studies / Christianity

Album Art for Title

Religious Studies RSS Feeds

Price: £2.95 Duration: 38mins Full topic price: £21.95

This title deals with the way Christians' values and beliefs impact upon their daily lives. Firstly, it will explore Christian views on the afterlife, and focus on opinions surrounding controversial issues such as abortion. The chapter 'Work and Leisure' will examine what Christians believe to be acceptable employment and their views about working on a Sunday. 'The Media' investigates the portrayal of religion in television, film and newspaper, while 'Drugs and Substance Abuse,' delves in to the Christian views on intoxicants. Issues surrounding the environment are investigated, and we look at why Christians believe it is their duty to protect our world. 'Conflict, Crime and Punishment' follows, and looks at war, just war theory and why we punish, while 'Prejudice and Discrimination' investigates racism and gender inequality. Finally, we explore what Christians think about Wealth and Poverty. 

Author: Sam Read Publisher: GCSEPod®
Narrator: Carol McGuigan ISBN: 978-1-84906-017-2
Video ISBN: 978-1-84906-517-7

Chapters

  1. Matters of Life and Death
  2. Work and Leisure
  3. The Media
  4. Drugs and Substance Abuse
  5. The Environment
  6. Conflict, Crime and Punishment
  7. Prejudice and Discrimination
  8. Wealth and Poverty

Exam Board Relevance

  • Edxcel
  • AQA
  • CEA
  • IGCSE (EdExcel)
  • OCR
  • SQA
  • WJEC
  • IGCSE (CiE)

Prepare for your next exam - View our recommended for you page to view relevant titles for all your exams.

Curriculum and Exam Board Information

Key Issues

Titles

Chapters

  • Abortion and euthanasia, with particular reference to Christian teachings
  • Environmental conservation and pollution, with particularreference to Christian stewardship and responsibility
  • Christian views of justice, reconciliation and peace
  • Forgiveness
  • The aims of punishment (retribution, deterrence, protection,reformation and vindication)
  • Christian views about conflict (terrorism, nuclear war, 'just' war,pacifism, disarmament) and protest
  • Issues relating to prejudice and discrimination in colour, race,gender and disability. This should include the study of the effectsof Christian beliefs on the work of one well known Christian.
  • Differences between rich and poor, including issues ofdevelopment, disease, population, debt and long term and shortterm (emergency) aid.
  • A study of the Christian motivation and the work of one of thefollowing voluntary agencies: Christian Aid
  • A study of the Christian motivation and the work of one of thefollowing voluntary agencies: CAFOD and/or TROCAIRE
  • A study of the Christian motivation and the work of one of thefollowing voluntary agencies: TEAR Fund
  • The Forgiving Father
  • The Good Samaritan
  • Respect for all People
  • The Unmerciful Servant
  • The Paralysed Man
  • The Centurion's Servant
  • The Practice of Justice and Reconciliation
  • The Lost Coin/Lost Sheep
  • Sickness and Healing
  • Attitudes to Sickness and Healing
  • The purpose and effects of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick
  • Attitudes to Death and Life after Death
  • Attitudes to Euthanasia
  • Retribution
  • Deterrence
  • Protection
  • Reformation
  • Prejudice and discrimination - with reference to race and religion
  • The role and status of women
  • Wealth and poverty
  • Suffering
  • Abortion
  • euthanasia
  • suicide
  • Respect and concern for the created world
  • Christian involvement in caring for those in need and building a better society
  • issues related to the sanctity of life, and Christian responses to these issues
  • issues related to birth control (contraception), fertility treatment (the right to a child and the use of embryos), abortion, suicide, and euthanasia.
  • Creation of humanity
  • Known before birth
  • Created by God
  • The body is a temple
  • Treatment of foreigners
  • Behaviour towards others
  • Who is my neighbour?
  • Race and gender
  • Resist evil and discrimination
  • Favouritism
  • Christian understandings of a 'Just War'; pacifism, and violent and non-violent protest; human rights, and prisoners of conscience.
  • A holy war
  • Fasting and human rights
  • A time of peace
  • Living and dying by the sword
  • Live at peace
  • Blessed are the peacemakers
  • Christian teaching relating to the problems facing the planet: the world as the creation of God, the concept of stewardship, environmental issues and Christian responses to them.
  • Stewardship
  • The glory of Creation
  • The place of humanity in the world
  • The world as belonging to God
  • Christian attitudes towards the poor and the weak
  • biblical teaching, the responses of the churches to poverty, and the work of at least one explicitly Christian aid organisation, e.g. Christian Aid, CAFOD or Tearfund.
  • Cheating the poor
  • The Sheep and the Goats
  • Indifference towards the poor
  • The place of the poor in the kingdom of God
  • issues related to the sanctity of life, and Christian responses to these issues
  • issues related to birth control (contraception), fertility treatment (the right to a child and the use of embryos), abortion, suicide, and euthanasia.
  • Creation of humanity
  • Known before birth
  • Created by God
  • The body is a temple
  • issues concerning race and gender
  • Treatment of foreigners
  • Behaviour towards others
  • Who is my neighbour?
  • Race and gender
  • Resist evil and discrimination
  • Favouritism
  • Christian understandings of a 'Just War'; pacifism, and violent and non-violent protest; human rights, and prisoners of conscience.
  • A holy war
  • Fasting and human rights
  • A time of peace
  • Living and dying by the sword
  • Live at peace
  • Blessed are the peacemakers
  • Christian teaching relating to the problems facing the planet: the world as the creation of God, the concept of stewardship, environmental issues and Christian responses to them.
  • Stewardship
  • The glory of Creation
  • The place of humanity in the world
  • The world as belonging to God
  • Christian attitudes towards the poor and the weak
  • biblical teaching, the responses of the churches to poverty, and the work of at least one explicitly Christian aid organisation, e.g. Christian Aid, CAFOD or Tearfund.
  • Cheating the poor
  • The Sheep and the Goats
  • Indifference towards the poor
  • The place of the poor in the kingdom of God
  • Christian views about what sets people apart from animals; Christian ideas about stewardship; Christian responses to environmental issues.
  • Different Christian attitudes towards abortion
  • Christian responses to issues raised by fertility treatment
  • Christian attitudes towards euthanasia and suicide
  • Christian beliefs about the use of animals in medical research
  • Biblical teaching about equality
  • Christian attitudes towards racism
  • The role of women in Christian society
  • Christian attitudes towards other religions: missionary work, evangelism, ecumenism, Christian beliefs about the status of non-Christian religions
  • Christian beliefs about forgiveness and reconciliation
  • The causes of hunger, poverty and disease
  • Christian teaching about concern for the poor and about the right uses of money
  • Giving to charity in Christianity
  • Christian teaching about moral and immoral occupations
  • Christian attitudes towards war: the Just War
  • Christian attitudes towards the use of violence and towards pacifism
  • Christian beliefs about the treatment of criminals
  • Christian responses to social injustice
  • The authority of personal conviction and conscience
  • Christian motivation through love for God and for one's neighbour, and responsibility for one's own actions
  • Christian attitudes to justice and equality with particular reference to poverty
  • Christian attitudes to prejudice and discrimination with particular reference to race and gender issues.
  • Humanitarian work in Britain: the work of NCH Action for Children and the Salvation Army.
  • Outreach to the world: support for the work of Christian Aid or Tear Fund
  • Holy Spirit, Lord and Giver of Life: person and work of the Holy Spirit in the Church and in the world; the Charismatic Movement.
  • Life after Death: Catholic belief about the soul, the after-life and the resurrection of the dead.
  • Christian attitudes to justice and equality with particular reference to poverty.
  • Christian attitudes to prejudice and discrimination with particular reference to race and gender issues.
  • Catholic social and humanitarian work: the work of CAFOD.
  • The Great Command
  • Concept of a 'missionary', and work undertaken by modern missionaries Mother Teresa.
  • Commitment to Education: reasons for Catholic schools; role of the church school in the mission of the Church.
  • Ecumenism: ways in which churches work ecumenically at local, national and international levels
  • Examples of ecumenical communities: outline of the life, work and influence of the Iona and Taizé Communities.
  • Christian concern for peace; responses to war and conflict in personal relationships and in society; the concept of a just war; pacifism and non-violent protest, reconciliation.
  • Christian concern for the care of the planet Earth; stewardship of the environment.
  • The poor in Latin America; Base communities, how change is effected, self-help groups, freedom and justice. Issues raised by the responses of Camilo Torres, Oscar Romero, Helder Camara.
  • Christian involvement in the Jubilee 2000 campaign.
  • The Church's sense of its calling and mission
  • The first Christian community
  • Images of the community: salt, light and leaven
  • Christian concern for peace; responses to conflict in personal relationships and in society; war; the concept of a just war; pacifism and non-violent protest; reconciliation
  • On murder; on reconciliation
  • On retaliation
  • Christian concern for the poor and oppressed; Christian attitudes towards and use of wealth.
  • Christian concern for justice in relation to law and order; obedience to the law; concern for the victims of crime; the punishment and rehabilitation of offenders.
  • The values by which Christians live: their expression in personal lifestyle and in dealings with other people
  • Christian values in the Beatitudes
  • Honesty
  • Doing good secretly
  • Humility and generosity
  • Christianity as a way of life
  • Service expects no reward
  • Taking up the cross
  • Entering by the narrow gate
  • Concern for those in need
  • Love one another
  • Commitment to Christ removes racial, social and gender divisions
  • The work of a Christian individual or organisation to champion human rights
  • The work of a Christian individual or organisation to alleviate poverty
  • Contrasting Christian views on suicide and euthanasia
  • Love your enemies
  • Non-violent approach
  • Sacrificial love
  • Just war principles
  • Example of a Christian individual using non-violent protest
  • Seeds of peace: Corrymeela
  • Catholic and contrasting views on IVF
  • Attitudes to overcoming infertility
  • When does life begin? 'You created us'
  • Attitudes to abortion
  • Issues of organ donation and genetic engineering
  • social attitudes to abortion
  • arguments for abortion
  • arguments against abortion
  • abortion and health professionals
  • abortion and the law
  • Christian teaching on abortion
  • forms of addiction
  • the reasons for drug use and gambling
  • the personal and social consequences of drug dependency and addiction
  • addiction and the law
  • Christian teaching on substance abuse and gambling
  • voluntary and involuntary Euthanasia
  • suicide and Euthanasia
  • the law and Euthanasia
  • Christian teaching on Euthanasia
  • Christian care for the terminally ill
  • employment and unemployment
  • responsibilities and rights in employment
  • the purpose of work
  • changing patterns of work
  • work as a vocation
  • Christian teaching on work
  • Sunday observance and leisure
  • changing patterns of leisure
  • Christian teaching on leisure
  • the reasons for crime
  • social attitudes to crime
  • personal and social consequences of crime
  • crime and justice
  • theories of punishment
  • capital punishment
  • Christian teaching on crime and punishment
  • repentance, forgiveness and justice
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to life after death, including resurrection, immortality of the soul, purgatory and heaven and hell.
  • Why Christians believe in life after death.
  • Reasons for belief in life after death not specific to any religion including near-death experiences and the paranormal.
  • Why some people do not believe in life after death.
  • Christian teaching on sanctity of life
  • The nature of abortion, including current British legislation and non-religious arguments concerning abortion.
  • Different Christian attitudes to abortion and the reasons for those attitudes.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to contraception, and the reasons for them.
  • The nature of euthanasia (assisted suicide, voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia), including current British legislation and arguments concerning euthanasia.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to euthanasia and the reasons for them.
  • How either TV soap operas or the national daily press deal with religious and moral issues of importance to Christians, including an in-depth study of ONE religious or moral issue that has been dealt with.
  • Christian teachings on: possession; uses and dangers of wealth; stewardship; almsgiving and charity; compassion and justice; the relationship between rich and poor.
  • The relief of poverty and suffering in the United Kingdom by Christians. Detailed knowledge of the work of ONE Christian person, community or organisation will be required.
  • An outline of the need for world development in response to the causes, extent and effects of poverty in the world.
  • The work of Christian agencies in world development and the relief of poverty. Detailed knowledge of ONE Christian agency and the reasons for its work will be required.
  • How unanswered prayers and the existence of evil and suffering (including moral evil and natural evil) may lead people to question or reject belief in God.
  • Why the existence of evil and suffering raises problems for people who believe in God as omnipotent, benevolent and omniscient. How Catholics respond to this problem.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to life after death, including resurrection, immortality of the soul, purgatory and heaven and hell.
  • Why Catholics believe in life after death.
  • Reasons for belief in life after death not specific to any religion including near-death experiences and the paranormal.
  • Why some people do not believe in life after death.
  • Catholic teaching on sanctity of life
  • The nature of abortion, including current British legislation and non-religious arguments concerning abortion.
  • Different Christian attitudes to abortion and the reasons for those attitudes.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to contraception, and the reasons for them.
  • The nature of euthanasia (assisted suicide, voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia), including current British legislation and arguments concerning euthanasia.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to euthanasia and the reasons for them.
  • The growth of equal rights for women in the United Kingdom.
  • Biblical teachings on the roles of men and women. Differences among Christians in their attitudes to the roles of men and women, including the role of women in ministry, and the reasons for them (equality and sexism).
  • The nature of the United Kingdom as a multi-ethnic society, including prejudice, racism and discrimination
  • Catholic teachings which help to promote racial harmony
  • The contribution of one modern Christian person or organisation to racial harmony, and the Christian basis for this work.
  • The quality, variety and richness of life in the United Kingdom as a multi-faith society, including considerations of religious freedom and religious pluralism.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to other religions (exclusivism, inclusivism, pluralism) and the reasons for them.
  • How either TV soap operas or the national daily press deal with religious and moral issues of importance to Christians, including an in-depth study of ONE religious or moral issue that has been dealt with.
  • Catholic teachings on: possession, uses and dangers of wealth; stewardship; almsgiving and charity; compassion and justice; the relationship between rich and poor.
  • The relief of poverty and suffering in the United Kingdom by Catholics. Detailed knowledge of the work of ONE Catholic person, community or organisation will be required.
  • An outline of the need for world development in response to the causes, extent and effects of poverty in the world.
  • The work of Christian agencies in world development and the relief of poverty. Detailed knowledge of ONE Catholic agency and the reasons for its work will be required.
  • How Christians make moral decisions: the authority of the Bible, the authority of the Church, the role of conscience, Situation Ethics.
  • The electoral system in the United Kingdom (first-past-the-post, proportional representation, local government, national government).
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to politics, including the separation of religion and politics and involvement in politics
  • The structure of the Welfare State in the United Kingdom and non-religious arguments about it. The Christian basis of the Welfare State: the Decalogue, the Golden Rule, the Parable of the Sheep and the Goats and Faith without Works
  • The different types of pollution and how they pose a threat to the future of the planet (including the greenhouse effect and acid rain). The scarcity of natural resources and how they pose a threat to the future of the planet. Non-religious arguments abou
  • Christian teachings on creation and stewardship which could have an effect on attitudes to the environment.
  • The teachings of ONE other religion on creation and stewardship which could have an effect on attitudes to the environment.
  • The work of ONE religious person, community or organisation in support of the conservation of the planet and its resources.
  • The issue of animal rights and non-religious arguments concerning animal rights. The teachings of Christianity and ONE other religion on animal rights.
  • TWO areas of conflict in the world today, including the reasons for the conflict. Nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction.
  • Differences among Christians in their attitudes to war, including pacifism and the just war, and the reasons for them. The attitudes to war of ONE other religion and the reasons for them. The work of ONE religious person, community or organisation for wor
  • Religious and non-religious attitudes to bullying. Causes of conflict between friends and families. The teachings of Christianity and ONE other religion on forgiveness and reconciliation.
  • The difference between a sin and a crime. The need for law and justice. Christian attitudes, and the attitudes of ONE other religion, to justice.
  • Theories of punishment (deterrence, retribution, reform). Christian teaching on judgement, forgiveness and punishment. The teaching of ONE other religion on judgement, forgiveness and punishment. A study of a prisoner of conscience imprisoned for her/his
  • The nature of capital punishment and the non-religious arguments about it. The attitudes of Christianity, and ONE other religion, to capital punishment.
  • Medical treatments for infertility. The attitudes of Christianity, and ONE other religion, to infertility treatments. Non-religious attitudes to infertility treatments.
  • The nature of genetic engineering. The attitudes of Christianity, and ONE other religion, to genetic engineering. Non-religious attitudes to genetic engineering
  • The types of transplant surgery and non-religious arguments about transplants. The attitudes of Christianity, and ONE other religion, to transplant surgery.
  • The Biblical cosmology and different Christian attitudes to it. The cosmology of ONE religion other than Christianity, and the attitudes of its followers to it.
  • The scientific cosmology (Big Bang and evolution) and religious attitudes to it.
  • How science and religion are connected (principles, purposes, methods, belief and experience). The ways in which some scientists see science as leading to or supporting belief in God.
  • The meaning and varieties of Christian vocation: the call to discipleship and the opportunity to witness open to every Christian through marriage, the family, daily life and work.
  • Traditional forms of dedication to the gospel in communities: the monastic life of renunciation; the commitment to poverty, chastity and obedience; service to God and others; the purpose and practice of ONE particular religious community.
  • Arguments among Christians about the balance between the contemplative and the active life.
  • The Sermon on the Mount as the guide for the Christian life: re-interpretation of the Law of Moses; displaying religion; Christians and money; Christians and judgement; the Golden Rule
  • The expression of Christian values: service to others, compassion for those who suffer, concern for the causes of suffering, helping those in need, seeking justice for the oppressed; in the lives of TWO exemplary Christians of the twentieth century.
  • The meaning and varieties of Christian vocation: the call to discipleship and the opportunity to witness open to every Christian through marriage, the family, daily life and work.
  • Traditional forms of dedication to the gospel in communities: the monastic life of renunciation; the commitment to poverty, chastity and obedience; service to God and others; the purpose and practice of ONE particular religious community.
  • Arguments among Christians about the balance between the contemplative and the active life.
  • The meaning and varieties of Christian vocation: the call to discipleship and the opportunity to witness open to every Christian through marriage, the family, daily life and work.
  • Traditional forms of dedication to the gospel in communities: the monastic life of renunciation; the commitment to poverty, chastity and obedience; service to God and others; the purpose and practice of ONE particular religious community.
  • Arguments among Christians about the balance between the contemplative and the active life.
  • The meaning and varieties of Christian vocation: the call to discipleship and the opportunity to witness open to every Christian through marriage, the family, daily life and work.
  • Arguments among Christians about the balance between the contemplative and the active life.

Reviews

Fabulous and will almost certainly help my daughter who permanently wanders around with an iPod on her head. All I have to do now is persuade her to download some content from the GCSEPod website and put it on her iPod.

Anthony T, Parent

You need to be logged in to review this title!

Other Titles in This Topic